INVESTIGATING THE IMPACT OF EXCESSIVE USE OF SOCIAL NETWORKING ON SELF-DISCLOSURE: EVIDENCE FROM PAKISTAN

Main Article Content

SHAMSA KANWAL
REN CHONG
ABDUL HAMEED PITAFI
SADIA AKHTAR
MUHAMMAD IRFAN

Abstract

Some research studies have suggested that obsessive social networking involvement could turn into compulsive behaviour among university students. Social networking sites or Web 2.0 is an open and public platform where users can communicate, share, and interact, as well as make social contacts. The important feature of this research is to access the impact of excessive use of social networking sites on SNS self-disclosure. Social networking is a popular tool, especially among the younger generation. The key idea of this study is to discover the mediating effect of SNS addiction and the excessive use of social networking sites, frequently with too much self-disclosure. Specifically, this study proposes a model that shows how SNS addiction increases. Further, this study also found a moderating effect of students’ personalities in these connections. For this study, data was collected online using the Google documents application with university students in Pakistan. In a total of 310 samples collected and analysed using SPSS software, version 21.0. Findings of this study show that Pakistani youth tend to have higher SNS addiction issues as a function of the need to share ideas and self-disclosure. Everyone (students, teens, adults) seeks a ‘sense of community,’ such that Social networking sites lend themselves too often getting overly involved vs handling school matters or work.

Keywords:
SNS self-disclosure, social networking site, perceived enjoyment, Pakistani students

Article Details

How to Cite
KANWAL, S., CHONG, R., PITAFI, A. H., AKHTAR, S., & IRFAN, M. (2018). INVESTIGATING THE IMPACT OF EXCESSIVE USE OF SOCIAL NETWORKING ON SELF-DISCLOSURE: EVIDENCE FROM PAKISTAN. Asian Journal of Arts, Humanities and Social Studies, 1(2), 74-91. Retrieved from http://ikpress.org/index.php/AJAHSS/article/view/4293
Section
Original Research Article